Skip to main content

Full text of "The Ruhleben camp magazine"

See other formats


MJm 



■ 






mMXfm 



19 



S3W 




ss^ii 



■ 



HHufiKfl 



W 



Jfls 






I 






mam 

■ HL 



S&& 









&9G 



- S 1 



■ 



■ 



Emm 






HYSICAL 
LTURE 

System. J&£ 

peaks for itself I III 

BARACKE 29 BOX? 
RUHLEBEN 








lEXBtTB 



THE 



RUHLEBEN CAMP 
MAGAZINE 



m 1. 



MHRCH 



1916. 




PUBLISHERS' NOTICE. 

(HE Education Committee wishes the statement 
to be made that the Camp Magazine, in being 

jj entinsted to its charge, is not intended to re- 
present any views of the Committee. The 

$ Education Committee regards itself in relation 
to the paper as an independent body responsible to the 
Camp for the paper's conformity to certain principles. 
These are that as far as possible the magazine shall appear 
punctually, that it shall be produced by the co-operation 
of all those in the Camp who are able and willing to assist, 
and shall express the true sentiment of the interned. It 
must aim at recording events and supplying some diversion 
from the tedium of the prisoner's life without offending 
susceptibilities. At the same time circumstances compel 
that the Camp paper shall be self-supporting. The Edu- 
cation Committee is making a fresh effort to attain these 
ends, and in witness of the renewal of the paper's original 
purpose has made some changes which include that of 
its title. . 

EDITORIAL. 

FEW of our readers, we imagine, realise the difficult con- 
ditions under which this Magazine is produced. For the matter 
of thar it is not necessary that they should. We all have 
difficulties with which to contend, and we do not expect readers 
to spend much time in condoling with us upon our particular 
trials and tribulations; we must overcome these as best as we 
can, and hope for the best. But we desire very earnestly to take 
our readers into our confidence upon one point, and to ask them 
for their help. We have the greatest difficulties in obtaining con- 
tributions from members of the Camp who are accustomed to 
writing. There is plenty of journalistic talent among us but, for 
some reason unknown to us, it is not forthcoming in anything like 
an adequate measure so as far as the Camp journal is concerned. 



The result of this regrettable state of affairs is that the standard 
of the Magazine falls far short of what it ought to be. Wei 
therefore make a frank appeal to all our journalistic and literary 
friends to give us a helping hand, and we are optimistic 
enough to hope that this appeal will not be made in vain. Our 
artists have from the beginning done yeoman service, and we are 
grateful to them for their clever and disinterested work on our 
behalf. This work is marred unfortunately by inadequate 
support on the part Of our writers. For the credit of the Camp 
we ask for this much-desired help; with suitable support we 
can produce a journal which will be a pleasure to read now, 
and will form, in days to come, a worthy reminder of our life 
in Ruhleben Lager. Without it we can at best achieve but 
poor results. Like the Israelites of old, we cannot produce 
bricks without straw. 

THERE is in existence a regulation, and a very reasonable 
regulation too, which prohibits the kicking <of footballs on the 
track reserved for walkers. Unfortunately this regulation has 
from the beginning been ignored by large numbers of men, with 
the result that those persons whose use of the sports ground 
19 limited to walking . exercise do not get a square deal. It is 
no fun to receive a football in the face, no matter how great the 
hilarity which follows. The discomfort caused by this promiscuous 
haking robs walking excercise of a good deal of its pleasure, 
and constitutes a real injustice to pedestrians. Our means of 
recreation are, in the nature of things, restricted, and we must 
all be prepared to give and take in order to obtain a maximum 
of enjoyment and benefit to the community at large. Accommo- 
dation for games is provided inside the ropes, and it is only fair 
to let walkers have their share of the ground which is put at 
their disposal. Will those persons whose somewhat thoughtless 
enthusiasm is the cause of this annoyance take a friendly hint, 
and give others fair play? 

WE are credibly informed that there exists in this Camp 
a young man Who (a) does not anoint his hair with brilliantine, 
and (b) contrives to take his walks abroad without the assistance 
of his friend's arm. If we are to judge by what we see, this 
singular young man is either a myth, or has been exchanged, 
though we are loath to cast doubts upon our informant's veracity: 
at any rate he is a rara avis. The habit of pouring a daily' 
libation of oleaginous matter upon the head is of respectable 
antiquity; indeed there is Biblical authority for it. It endows 
the cranium with an appearance of brightness which might other- 
wise be lacking ; r as a )w,aterproof agent it is of undoubted efficacy ; 
it puts the sardine to shame, and renders the wearing of a hat 
unnecessary. Not all of us have hair enough to keep a sprinkler 
employed (which may account for the apparent acerbity of these 
remarks), but notwithstanding these indubitable advantages we 
take leave to doubt if the fashion will last; firstly, because, being 
a fashion it must change, and secondly, because contemporary 
history is likely to displace the musical comedy actor as a 
model ot masculine beauty. Sterner ideals will probably oust 
this attachment to the juice ot the olive. ... As to the arm-in-arm 
business, frankly, it is overdone in Ruhleben ; it involves a deal 
of unnecessary manoeuvring at the end of the "beat", and 
looks girlish. With which sorrowful but, probably, ineffective 
observation we take leave of the subject. 



W>. 






THE diminution of hot water supply to the Camp, which 
marks the arrival of Sunday, is surely the least desirable way of 
celebrating the seventh day of the week. So far as we know 
there is no sufficient reason for this cutting short of the first 
necessity of life once a week, but we speak subject to correction. 
We do not want to scald our fingers! If the boilers require 
scraping could not this work be done in the evening ? a minimum, 
instead of a maximum of inconvenience would then be caused. 
We cannot do without hot water, and the delay in issuing the 
commodity on Sundays inflicts a real hardship on many. 

NIL DESPERANDUM! 




H-STQNER, I wonder If this ftuhleben business hasondermiaed our health. 7 
/ STON ER, 4 Dunnowj suits me down, to the Ground J I fee{ (i ke a HercuLes f * 



m 



6 



MR. STANLEY LJtMBERT 

of the Schonungf'Baracke. 

WHEN Ruhleben Concentration Lager first came into 
existence Mr. Lambert began a career of usefulness by 
distributing early morning rolls in Barrack 8. From this lowly 
sphere of action he emerged, to become interpreter between ;the 
medical Staff of the Camp and their patients. Mr. Lambert's 
services were invaluable at that time in making things easier 
for patient and doctor, and the language difficulty was success- 
fully met. Thus, from the earliest Ruhleben days, Mr. Lambert 
has been identified with the medical administration of the 
Lager. ___ 

Greater things were in making, however; in the fullness 
of time the Schonung's Baracke made its appearance in order 
to cope with pressing necessity; more elaborate arrangements 
were made to deal with sickness and casualties, and the post 
of interpreter, by a natural process of evolution, developed to 
keep pace with growing requirements. The Baracke contains 
forty beds in all, on which Mr. Lambert keeps a vigilant 
eye, being entrusted with the routine and detail work of the 
Baracke, subject, of course, to professional control. 

Indeed, to know Mr. Lambert and his work it is necessary 
to become an inmate of the Schonungs Baracke; the public and 
casual eye sees neither the one nor the other. The hours 
are long and the conditions, by the nature of things, 
none of the brightest, while the heavy and continuous work 
involves the keeping of late hours. Few people, we imagine, 
burn the candle at both ends to such an extent or to such 
good purpose as Mr. Lambert. A few rounds of the field are 
all that he allows himself by way of exercise and recreation, 
in the intervals of attending to the necessities and comforts 
of the sick community in the Lager. The writer of these lines 
would give more details of Mr. Lamberts work, if he could ; 
but his request for information was met with a refusal. Mr. 
Lambert prefers to do his work in his own way, — which 
is not the way of publicity and print. 

When the record of life jat Ruhleben comes to be examined, 
and the work o\f its members is appraised at its real, and not 
at its advertised value, Mr. Lambert's unobtrusive labours 
will meet with some recognition, if it is only that of gratitude. 
We are glad to be able to publish Mr. Lambert's portrait and 
thus to give our fellow interned at any rate a nodding 
acquaintance with one who has worked so unselfishly on 
behalf of us all. 







c n 



C ft: >{^fJ,^lC, , 



^■■44&*j$$ U 



THE THEATRE. 

WE should like, first of all, to take this opportunity of 
congratulating Mr. John Roker and all his collabora- 
tors on the success of the Christmas pantomime. "Cinderella" 
was really a wonderful show from every point of view, and 
let us see how far we have travelled in theatrical production 
since that excellent pioneer attempt "Androcles and the 
Lion." 

A jolly well-trained chorus, rollicking rag music, funny 
comedians and startling realistic feminine creations added to 
a book, written by C. E. Brooks, which included plenty ;of 
topical plums and humorous situations — all these, with 
potted plays and pretty scenery, were ingredients that cooked 
up !to make a very entertaining hotch-potch indeed. Among 
the artistes were Harry Stafford, who gave us some first- 
class comedy; Harold Goodhind, more charming and girlish 
than ever in the title role; S. F. Austin with a good song; the 
Maurice Bros, with an interesting dance; R. Castang as a 
"lidy", and many others too numerous to mention individually. 

Perhaps the most striking features in the performance 
were the scenic effects, which were a big step ahead of 
anything yet attempted here. The • long run and the ent- 
husiastic receptions were ample evidence to all who had 
taken a share in the production of the grateful appreciation 
of the camp. 

The Pantomime was followed by Synge's "Play-boy of 
the Western World". As already emphasised in this column, 
the Irish Society do far better and are much surer of 
success when they attack a first-class play, than when they 
try to widen their public by producing second-rate stuff. As 
an interpretation of a deep and rather subtle satire it left 
something to be desired ; the burlesque handling left no room 
for a note, of /pathos which-apparently there against its will-is 
one of the qualities that make ithe play a unique and wonderful 
expression of national feeling; the beauty of the language, 
too, was lost. Nevertheless the performance was an ex- 
tremely interesting and pleasant experience, and we shall look 
forward with sharpened interest to the next Irish production. 

"Der Erbforster" was — to put it kindly — a mistake. 
Whatever drew the Society responsible for its production 
to such a choice? The acting — except in the title-role -— 
was well up to the average; the scenic work very satisfactory 
indeed, and the production, as a whole, a good and sound 
piece of work. But the play ! Such a play, in such a camp 
as this, is an anomaly, an anachronism. Morally and artistic- 
ally, we prefer Drury Lane melodrama. It's healthier. The 

(Continued on page 10) 



m 



X 
H 

Z 

o 



o 
< 

H 

</3 



u 




10 



sight of that imbecile strutting up and down the stage, 
yelling his hysterical, mock-heroic, mock-morality at the top 
of his voice was calculated to weaken one's faith in the 
ultimate sanity of the human race. That kind of thing is 
vicious. It belongs by right to the age of the medicine-man, 
trial by torture, and cannibalism. 

Objectively — i. e., for those who interest themselves in 
the German language, and — ethnologically — the play was 
doubtless instructive. 

Why doesn't the German Society produce something good? 
They've got the men. 

Our camp producers are apparently growing somewhat 
diffident as regards their own judgment of a -good play, and 
the tendency to put on plays which have lately obtained |a 
big success in a London theatre is growing in consequence. 
The old well-tested stagers, too, are coming in for a good 
share of attention. This tendency — which is in many re- 
spects to be deplored — was no doubt responsible for ithe 
choice of Bennett's "Great Adventure." It must not be for- 
gotten that many of these modern successes have been "made" 
in town, and that much of their success is due to the fact 
that they were written for and round certain popular actors ; 
the genuine play, by which is meant the play of genuine 
merit, whether in situation, character or idea, is a safer 
horse for the amateur cast. Thus the two plays of Gals- 
worthy which have been given here were better done, and 
better appreciated than "The Great Adventure"; in spite of 
the excellent renderings given in the latter play by Welland, 
West, Hart and Goodchild. 

Those play-goers who look for something more than an 
hour's entertainment and a good laugh will do well to watch 
the notices of the A. & S. U. Several Monday evenings have 
been devoted of late to short lectures on various dramatists, 
followed by illustrative one-acters and fragments of more 
ambitious dramas. Those who had the pleasure of attending 
the three short plays of Strindberg, and, on another occasion, 
of seeing Merritt and Percy Maurice in "Major Barbara" will 
agree with us in thinking the plays well worth a lecture, h. m. 



TO the above we must add that Mr. Hugh Miller's one-act 
pieces, "Geordie" and "Breakers Ahead!" which were produced 
on the 9 th. February, met with a cordial reception and thoroughly 
well-deserved success. The former is a dramatic and powerful piece 
pf work, written in the Tyneside dialect; "Breakers Ahead!" is a 
comedy of the "rattling" order. The slight jerkiness of its action is 
more than compensated for by the unquestionable brilliance of the 
lines. We shall, we hope, see more of "Geordie" for its genuine 
humour shows that in Mr. Miller we have among us a dramatist 
of much promise. 



■i 

11 



H 




THE BURNS NIGHT CONCERT 



Y. M. C. A/ HALL 



By A. BROWN. 



12 



FOOTBJtLL. 



BEFORE the commencement of the second half of the 
season the F. A. were somewhat divided in their opi- 
nions regarding the date of re-starting. It was originally 
intended to get on with the league programme on Jan. 1 st, 
but the atmospheric conditions prevented us doing so. John 
Cameron was strongly in favour of postponing the league 
tournament until March, his reasons being that the prospects 
of fit weather for football for any continuous period were 
very uncertain before that date, and further that the real 
interest in the league was only maintained when the games 
take place day after day, without the lengthy breaks which 
occur through the playing pitches being unfit for use during 
January and February. How sound was his advice has been 
proved. As is only right, however, the opinion of the majority 
prevailed and this was against Cameron's motion; in conse- 
quence we got into full harness again in the second week 
of the New Year. 

Barrack 9's long lead in the first half season has robbed 
the competition of a certain amount of interest, and their 
great victories in the second half up to date prove that no 
other team has got a. ghost of a chance of preventing them 
winning the league comfortably. In fact I shall be surprised 
if they do not emulate the performance of Barrack 1 in our 
first campaign, and finish up without being defeated. The 
only Barrack which I thought capable of giving them a run 
was 1.0. But 10 always remind me of an epitaph I once 
heard suggested for a man at home. "He lived a life of going- 
to-do, and died with nothing done." They have a side on 
paper, and on the field, equal to any in the Camp; and yet, 
for some reason or other, they never quite "get there." 

. Barrack 2 re-opened like lions refreshed. Their perfor- 
mance in defeating 10, by 6 goals to 2, is the greatest thing 
they have yet done, for they gained their victory without 
question of fluke or luck. This should give Jack Swift's 
Barrack just that necessary spur which was needed for his 
team. They have always had a good side individually, but 
lacked combination. Now that they have proved the usefulness 
of combined effort they will probably go on to further 
successes. 

Another team which has settled down to really fine 
football is Barrack 8. They were the heroes in one of the 
most interesting and- exciting games ever seen in Ruhleben. 
The match was against Barrack 11, who played to such 
advantage in the early stages that they were leading by 5 
goals to nothing in the first twenty minutes. Before half 



13 



time 8 had. made the score 5 — 2. This seemed a large enough 
advantage to ensure 11 securing the two points, but 8 
stuck to their guns and eventually ran out victors by 6 — 5. 
A very creditable performance! 

Although Barrack 5 have had to take the field for some 
time without their brilliant full back, and Captain Bob Ste- 
wart, this does not account entirely for their poor displays in 
comparison with last season's form. There is no doubt some 
of their players have not fulfilled the hopes we had of them 
last season. The reason for this (and it applies equally to 
nearly every Barrack in the Camp) is that the players are not 
taking the same keen interest in football that they did when 
the game was first introduced here. From a sensible point of 
view they are good judges, too. . Unless they desire to become 
professional footballers and, with this end in view train and 
learn the game assiduously, they can occupy their time in 
much more useful channels educationally, than in devoting 
their time and energy to sport. A year ago it was different. 
Sport was then practically everything to us, but at present 
sport just fills its proper function among us ; which is the 
provision of healthy exercise without interfering with the 
study of those subjects which make for the advancement of 
a man's career. So that even if football, from the point of 
view of cleverness, has shown considerable deterioration it 
should be rather a matter for * congratulation than other- 
wise. For it proves that the amateur has found something 
of greater importance to fill his hours than in mastering the 
intricacies of football. It is said that proficiency at billiards 
is a sure sign of a misspent youth. Football might often be 
substituted for billiards. 

FRED. B. PENTLAND. 




14 



RUGBY. 



IN reviewing the past half-season one is chiefly struck 
by the wonderful strides that have been made in form and 
quality of play. This is very evident indeed in the Second 
League. The writer would like to congratulate those who started 
to play Rugby this year for the first time on their wonderful 
improvement. The first part of this last half was occupied 
with the League matches, and very hard and interesting games 
they were. In no case was there a single run-away victory, 
though, on paper, several teams are streets ahead of the rest. 
For example, the "Nomads" with such a brilliant back division, 
backed up by good spoiling forwards, ought to have beaten 
every team by at least 15 — 0; but the great fault of dropping 
passes has nearly proved their downfall several times. They 
cannot improve on their full-back, and have such a three-quarter 
line to which it would give a forward to play if they could 
only hold their passes. Their forwards are fine "spoiling" 
men, but unfortunately they are too spoiling at times. 

"Blackheath" had the misfortune to be without a reliable 
three-quarter line, Smythe, their wing, being the only man 
of danger, and it is due mostly to their full-back and captain 
that they maintained a position at the head of the league. 

The "Wasps" have the makings of a fine team, but never 
seem to have been able to work together, except in the 
semi-final for the Cup Tie. -They have fairly good forwards, 
and a tricky back line, but they always always just manage 
to lose. Their full-back is undoubtedly the best in the camp. 

The "Harlequins" are a very patchy team, and at first 
it appeared as if they would be very weak, but their captain 
has worked them into fine shape, and now it takes a very 
strenuous effort to be able to beat them. 

The "United Services" suffered greatly through losing 
their captain and best forward early in the season, through 
injuries, which fact seemed to render them powerless, but 
nevertheless they always managed to put up a great fight. 

In the Second League, the "Wasps" certainly hold the 
palm for keenness and general improvement. As far as the 
rest of the second teams are concerned, it is very difficult to 
criticise, as they were always so variable. 

In the second half of the season, a very keen and inter- 
esting Cup Tie was played, producing the most brilliant game 
we have seen in this camp, namely: — "Barbarians" 2nd. v. 
"Wasps" 1 st. in the second round. "Harlequins" were 
unlucky to meet the ultimate winners in the second round, 
but put up a splendid fight. The final, "Nomads" v. "Wasps" 
was one of the hardest and keenest games it has been the 



■ 



15 



good fortune of the writer to witness, ending in a win for 
"Nomads" by 8 points to 3. 

Since then only two matches of the second round of the 
League have been played, "Blackheath" defeating "Harlequins", 
and "Barbarians" the "Wasps". On an improvement of weather 
these league matches will be continued, and the season finished 
up with a series of international matches. 

The writer would like to add one word of advice to 
all players, and that is, tackle as hard as you can and low, 
but not too low. "VILLAGER." 




My Favourite Nugktmare !! 



16 




WORK has been going on apace in both the branches of 
most educational interest to seafarers, i. e. Navigation 
and Engineering. The classes are now well attended, and 
we are pleased to be able to announce that the Board of Trade 
have made certain concessions regarding sea service to those 
whose work is satisfactory. Particulars * as to this can be 
obtained at the School Office, Bar 6. 

The latest addition to this Branch of instruction is a 
course of interesting lectures on Nautical Astronomy, by Cap- 
tain Thomson. 

The Nautical and M. E. A. Circles have not been idle, and 
the following lectures have been given during the present 
year : — 

In the Nautical Circle:— Mr. H. Scholes on "Preven- 
tion of Fire at Sea"; Mr. R. Venables on the "Sun"; Mr. JF. 
H. Smith on "Dangerous Chemicals as Cargo"; Dr. Lechmere 
on "Barnacles"; Mr. R. Kindersley on "Irrigation in the Sou- 
dan"; Mr. E. L. Carr on "Formation of Land and Sea". In 
the M. E. A. Circle: — Mr. F. Scholes on "Fire Extinguishing 
Plant for Steamers"; Mr. C. J. Pearce on "Trade Unionism"; 
Mr. T. G. Williams on "Fuel"; Mr. R. Chalmers on "The Rise 
and Progress of Marine Motors"; Mr. Venables on the "Work 
of some Eminent Engineers". 

The most sincere gratitude is felt by the members of 
these Circles, for the very instructive and interesting evenings 
which have been provided by these gentlemen. 

Among the M. E. A. fixtures in the near future, we are 
glad to announce Mr. Wechsler on "Oxi-acetelyne Welding"; 
Mr. John Murray on "Lining Off"; Mr. Lockyer Roberts on 
"Engineering"; Mr. Welcome on "Propellers". Our Chairman, 
Mr. P. M. Shaw, is booked for a lecture on "Practical Fuel 
Economy". These fixtures should attract a large number of 
members. 

The above list of lectures has been kindly supplied by 
Messrs. J. H. Adams and F. E. Fanning. 

Amongst nautical people, quite as much as amongst others, 
here in Ruhleben, items of news have a curious habit of 



■ *: 



17 



getting mixed up with fiction. Result — rumours ! About the 
last week in January of this present year of grace, a gentleman 
hailing from somewhere about Bradford, or possibly Leeds 
(not a sajilor), spoke as follows: "Have you heard the latest? 
The House of Lords has given a decision that the sailors 
are not entitled to a penny of their wages, either now or 
any other time, because the Working Gang here is getting 
five bob a week for carting coal into the Camp ; while other 
people are sitting in deck-chairs, watching them making roads, 
aye! and playing football and cricket, and playing in orchestras, 
Cinderellas, and playing the fool generally!" 

No doubt the Lords have really and truly given a decision 
against seamen on the wages question, and why they did 
so is, of course, their own ^business. In spite of all that the 
Guild (there is only one) and others could do, they could 
not bring the Lords to the right way of thinking. At any 
rate, those who took the seamens' part have the satisfaction 
of having had the "best two out of three", for the case was 
tried in two other Courts which were, as far as we can gather, 
properly constituted Courts, consisting of people trained and 
chosen for that kind of work. Both of these Courts decided 
in favour o f the seamen. 

One begins to wonder where the Upper House get their 
superior skill from ; but then, who are we, that we should 
judge the noble Lords? Quite a few yars ago some 
serious minded man is reported to have said something 
to the effect that we should not judge one another, for 
every one is ,as he was created, and still worse in many cases ! 

That the judgment of the Lords was in the slightest degree 
influenced by the varied performances of our Working Gang, 
or by the fact that they are rewarded by a sum not exceeding 
five marks per week, is hardly likely. In all probability the 
Lords are not worrying an awful lot about us ; why should 
they? We have two governments to look after us, as it is; and 
a special parcel post system connecting us with those we 
are dependent upon. And the gentleman who said that Santa 
Clans would not get his five marks a week, if he came into 
the Camp without a birth certificate, was hardly fair to 
Santa Claus ! 

Referring to the decision in the wages question, we are 
pleased to see the Guild has done its best; but we are also 
pleased to see that other Societies have been watching the 
proceedings in the interest of the various branches concerned. 

Mr. Havelock Wilson's letter has come like a ray of 
sunshine, as at least he gives us a little hope, which has 
become part of our daily fare in Ruhleben. 
(We shall be glad to receive criticism on the above. — Ed.) 



19 



Ji QUIET EVENING. 



IT was 6.30 p. m., andf I had the box to myself. "I'll just 
write a postcard to Martin;", I said to myself, "finish my 
French, and have some supper". So I got down my things, 
sharpened my pencil, and endeavoured to think of something 
original, witty, and penetrating to commence with. Then 
getting itired of thinking, I started to read Martin's last letter 
to me. 

"I suppose you are getting on splendidly with your 
French, having nothing to do all day", it began. When I had 
got so far, I was interrupted by a knock at the door. 

"Come in!" I cried. 

A stranger opened the door, looked round, and finding 
no one in but myself, promptly asked : 

"Is Brown in?" 

"No", I said absently, "any message?" 

"It's all right, thanks; I'll come later." 

I began to read the letter again, but was soon interrupted 
by a second knock. 

"Come in!" I called again, and a second individual peered 
round the room, and then asked : — 

"Is Brown in?" 

"No!" I said, more curtly this time. 

"That's funny — ," he began. He was a garrulous-looking 
person. 

"Curious idea you have of humour", I remarked, 
whereupon he too withdrew. 

I had got as far as writing "Dear Martin" on a postcard, 
when a third knock came. 

"Oh! Come in!" 

This visitor also had a good look round before asking: — 

"Is Brown here?" 

I was annoyed. "Does it look as if he is here?" I 
inquired. "Can you see him here, or. do you think he has 
hidden in one of the biscuit tins?" 

"No-o." 

"Or do you think he is entertaining some friends under 
the bed, or is curled up asleep in his bread box?" 

"I thought — " 

"I don't believe you! I don't believe you ever think! You 
don't look like a person who does think. However, it does 
not matter. Good evening!" 

He went away quietly, and I was able to write three 
lines before the next interrupter arrived. 

"Co-ome jnP' I groaned. 

The door was pushed open, and a pair of be-spectacled 



20 



eyes glanced round the room, then gleamed at me. 

"Come right in", I insisted, seeing the hateful question 
on his lips. "Come right in, and listen to me. I know what 
yon want. I place the whole of the box unreservedly at your 
disposal, to aid you in your search for him! Chairs, shelves, 
provisions, bed, my humble self, — all are at your service ! 
Look for him; give yourself up to your search; put all your 
energy into it! If you find him, I shall be the first to 
congratulate you; if not, you will have the satisfaction - of 
knowing that he is not here!" 

He wa,s a pale young man, and seemed rather scared. 

"I'll be back later", he said, and disappeared hastily. 

I put the postcard on one side, and drew up a notice, 
stating briefly and definitely, in large and legible letters, that 
Brown was not in. Just as' I was hanging it up, who should 
appear but Brown himself ! 

"Anyone been for me?" he enquired; "I asked one or 
two men to come over and discuss next season's cricket 
prospects." 

"Yes", I ,replied grimly; "but they all went away in a 
hurry!" 

"I must go and look for them", said Brown, and promptly 
disappeared. 

"Now I shall have some peace — "I throught, and I did — 
for at least five minutes. Then came that infernal knock 
again 1 

"Can't you see that Brown is not in?" I yelled. 

"I dont want Brown", said a voice, as the door slowly 
slid open. 

"Why not?" .1 asked. That puzzled him for a minute, 
but at length he determined to ignore it. 

"I want Collins", he said. "Can you tell me where he is?" 

"How should I knoiw where he is? Do you think I'm 
his nurse, or his secretary? Do you take me for a private 
detective agency, or a magician? Do you imagine — " But 
I was talking to thin air. 

I again put my postcard on one side, and drew up a 
fresh notice. 

To all whom it may concern! No one is in this box 
except M;. P. Smith, who has no knowlege as to ithe whereabouts 
of any of its other members. If one of them is lost, apply at 
the Police Office'. 

I fixed this also to the door. By this time, of course, 
my pencil was blunt. Before I had even time to sharpen it, 
the door opened. 

"Could you lend me your hammer for a moment, please?" 



-■ ■■ ■ 



21 

"N<o, I can't." 

"1 only just want to hammer a nail in." 

"Do you suppose I thought you wanted to smash up a 
Dreadnought with it? Even if you told me you wanted that 
nail hammered in to hang yourself from :; I could not let you 
have the hammer, much a,s! I should like to be of assistance 
in such a laudable work!" 

"Is Mr. Smith in?" said another voice. 

"Yes, but he has no time for you!" 

"I wont keep you a moment, Mr. Smith. Bull I understand 
you are interested in literature, and; I just called round about 
the new Circle." 

"If you think you can come to practise your wretched 
jokes on me", I shouted, jumping up, "you are mistaken! 
Get out, both of you! Dont you see I'm busy? Here have 
I been trying to do a little work, and can't, because every 
minute some silly fool — " 

"Oh! Mr. Smith...." said a new voice. 

I sank back, overcome, beaten, crushed ! 

"Gentlemen"/, I pleaded, "what have I ever done to you? 
I have tried to be kind and good. I have offended nobody. 
Why this persecution? I only want to spend a quiet evening!" 

"My dear chap", said the new comer, "in that case you 
should have started a little earlier . . . It's twenty to nine 
already!" T. G. 



H J€ 5WJStorical Circle 




22 



THE DEBATING SOCIETY. 

Dear Inkstains, 

Not having heard from me for so long, I presume that 
you are under the impression that both the old talking Club 
and myself have come to a full-stop. Not a bit of it! We 
are both going ahead, and just lately we have had quite a 
little renaissance in the Debating line. I don't know if de- 
bating is regarded as too serious a business for holidays, 
but during December our attendances began to fall off, and 
the beginning of the New Year was also a bit slack. Then the 
Camp, having booked all its bets as to whether another 
Christmas would find us here, suddenly awoke to the fact 
that the Debating Society w,as still in existence, and the much 
advertised Thackeray evening found the Hall crammed. Se- 
veral of the intellectual lights of the Camp had promised to 
give readings, though one or two cried off at the last mo- 
ment, on the score that "they had really not read Thackeray 
for so long!" And when. I looked at the pieces selected they 
really seemed too boring for words. This conduct on the 
part of the intellectual gents aforesaid gave our Chairman 
his chance, so that, instead of having Thackeray on Snobs, 
we had Butterworth on Intellectual Nuts; result, — another 
up for Manchester, as a sporting writer would put it. Cohen 
gave a really bright little account of Thackeray's life, and 
Pearce and Strachan gave us short readings. 

"That the abolition of Trade Unions would not be to 
England's benefit" was an excellent subject for the posters, 
but the debate itself was a trifle flat. Pearce and L. J. Ball 
were the chief speakers for, and J. H. Corless and Fuller 
against the motion. One could not help feeling that the ad- 
vocates of Trade Unionism had rather an unfair advantage in 
having some knowledge of the subject, whereas their oppo- 
nents had none. Naturally the audience plumped for the 
Unions. J. H. Jones made quite an interesting little speech 
on the Arbitration and Conciliation Act of New Zealand, 
but did not commit himself to either side. 

We followed this up with an anecdote evening, which 
was a tremendous success, only one or two of the yarns being 
of an antediluvian character. 

If you will consult our list of fixtures for the next week 
or two you will see that, if we are not thinking of the pro- 
blems of the day, we are, at least, talking about them. 

Yours ever, 

THE MAD HATTER (2). 



■Hfc 



23 



"A YOUNG MAN'S FANCY." 

With poetic inspiration, on the -wing 
Of my Pegasus, I now propose to sing 
Of the ardent lover's fancy -waistcoat, worked for him by Nancy, — 
Its the kind of thing you only see in spring! 
Of the busy bee — so busy with its sting — 
Of the mossy glades, and all that kind of thing, 
Of the lambkins, so romantic, as they frisk in frolics antic, 
Urged by frenzy Corybantic, 

In the Spring! 

Have you ever seen Ruhleben in the Spring? 

It is there that all my tender fancies cling; 

Where the wooden-footed shuffler, well enveloped in a muffler, 

Wipes his eyes, and blows his "snuffler", 

In the Spring; 
But this year the gentle zephyrs do not bring 
With them hope, and youth will not have any fling: 
Damon much against his will is parted from his loving Phyllis, 
And his hope reduced to nil is 

In the Spring! 

Let the birds prepare their airy homes in Spring, 
Let every little blighter chirp and sing, — 
All this joy and jubilation bear for me no consolation, 
I am tired to desperation 

In the Spring! 
But, before I stop, there is one little thing, 
That I ought to mention (a propos of Spring), 
I am weary of the slacking, and with joy I'd start my packing, 
In the Winter, or the Summer, 

Or the Spring! F. C. R. 




■ 



24 



MIRACLE 



Jetudiais tranquillement, Tout ahuri, je le suivais, 

Quand mon ami vint en courant Vis dans la cour, des prisonniers 

M'interpeller d'une voix breve: Oeil grand ouvert, levre tremblante, 

— Oh! Sansouci, non! non! je reve! La voiture et sa rossinante. 



— Ou 'y a-t-il done? — Viens dans 

la cour. 
Le linge est la, car e'est son jour, 
Viens, cours, et vois quelle trouvaille! 
Le sang me brule et me tiraille ! 



— Comment! ami, e'est pour si peu 
Que tu te mets la tete en feu? 

— Tiens ! la, dedans; dis si je reve? 

— Misericorde ! une jeune Eve!! 

SANSOUCI. 



CHESS. 

THE appearance of an article on chess will, we think, 
be welcomed by the large number of interned who have 
devoted time to this game, and whose interest, in its intri- 
cacies increases as time goes on. We hope that this column 
may become a medium for exchanging views, solving pro- 
blems, and answering queries. 

With this end in view we propose to publish, from time 
to time, simple chess problems, and interesting games Jby 
good players ; suggestions will be welcomed, and we shall 
be glad to hear from players in the Camp, in order to make 
this article of general interest, and utility. 

PEOBLEM No. 1 
Black 




White 
White to move, arid mate in two moves- 



BxSHI 



\ ?i.t 



■ 






25 



The principal openings are the King's gambit, Queen's 
gambit, the King's Knight's gambit, the King's Bishop's open- 
ing, &c, from which are formed the various other gambits. 



The following is an intere 


stin^ 


I illustration 


of the King's 


gambit :— 










WHITE. 


BLACK. 




WHITE. 


BLACK. 


1. KP.2 


K.P. 2 


11. 


Kt. to B. 2 


B. to Kt. 5 (ch.) 


2 K.BP. 2 


P. takes P. 


12. 


Kt. takes B. 


P. takes Kt.(ch) 


3. K.Kt. to B. 3 


K.Kt P. 2 


13. 


K takes Kt 's P 


K.Kt.toB3(ch.) 


4. K.R.P. 2 


K.Kt.P. 1 


14. 


K. to R. 3 


R. takes P. (ch.) 


5. Kt. to K. 5 


B. to Kt. 2 


15. 


K. takes R. 


Kt.toK.5(disch) 


6. Kt. takesKt.'sP. 


Q.P. 2 


16. 


K. to Kt. 4 


Kt. to B. 7 (ch.) 


7. P. takes P. 


Q. to K. 2 (ch.) 


17 


K. to R. 5 


Q. to K. 4 (ch.) 


8. K. to B. 2 


B. to Q. 5 (ch.) 


18 


K to R. 4 


Q. to B. 3 (ch ) 


9. K. to B. 3 


K.R.P. 2 


19 


K to R. 5 


Q. to Kt. 3 (ch) 


10. B.to = Kt.5(ch.) 


K. to Q. square. 


20. 


K. to R. 4 


B. to B. 3 (check- 
mate). 


Solutions and Queries she 


)uld 


be addressed 


CORNER", care 


of Editor. 






M. R. E. 



In OUR Theatre 




OLD GENTLEMAN (whose toe has justbeerx -trodden tipon) "yOURE NOT VEKV 

LIGHT ON YOVR FEET , OLD MAM "J 
THE LATECOMER : " WHAT DYB BXPECT IN RUHLEBEN, EH? MAUD ALLEN ? " 



26 



RUHLEBEN MUSICAL SOCIETY. 




NYTHING like a detailed report of the eleven concerts 
given by the above Society, since it commenced its 
•activities in October last, is, of course, quite impossible within 
the limits of this brief review. Orchestral, choral and cham- 
ber concerts, instrumental and vocal recitals, and an English 
ballad concert have all been given, and the hall has been 
filled to its utmost capacity on nearly every occasion. In 
the four orchestral concerts, the most successful work has 
been accomplished in compositions for strings only. This is 
no reflection on the wind instrument players, who have done 
excellent, work, and made steady improvement, but is only 
natural when the wind-department is as incomplete as it 
is here. As far as purely orchestral music is concerned,, 
the following works were the most successful : — 

Grieg's "Peer Gynt" Suite (Mr. Macmillan). 

Elgar's "Serenade", and Grainger's "Mock Morris" (Mr. 
Bainton). 

Tschaikowsky's "Serenade" and Saint-Saens' "Danse Ma* 

cabre" (Mr. Weber). 
A very expressive rendering of Grieg's charming, music was 
secured, the strings sounding really beautiful in "The Death 
of Ase". It should be added that Mr. Macmillan undertook 
the direction of this concert at extremely short notice, owing 
to the sudden illness of Mr. Gossart. Elgar's rather ,wild 
Serenade for Strings received a highly finished performance, 
the second movement being particularly well done; and 
Grainger's rollicking "Mock Morris" was played with great 
spirit, although it requires a bigger body of strings to give 
it full effect. One hopes that conductors of future concerts 
will follow Mr. Bainton's example, and include works by our 
native composers in their programmes. Tschaikowsky's Sere- 
nade for Strings, like most of his compositions, is curiously 
unequal. The first movement is interesting and effective, 
and the Valse quite delightful: but the "Elegie" is poorly 
constructed and sentimental, while the introduction to the 
Finale is inexpressibly weak. Still, the. work makes very 
pleasant hearing, especially when played as well as on this 
occasion. It is by no means easy, and its performance was 
highly creditable to all concerned. The "Danse Macabre" 
sounded exceedingly well, the wind in this instance being 
really effective. Mr. Adler's orchestral version of Mr. Boc- 



27 



quet's pianoforte Ballade can hardly be accounted success- 
ful. One could not but regret that this work, which had 
already been played here in its original form, should have 
been dished up again in such a blatant and clumsy arrange- 
ment. The time spent in its preparation might with advantage 
have been devoted to Mozart's Symphony in G minor, the 
performance of which work clearly betrayed insufficient 
rehearsal. The most interesting feature of this concert was 
the first performance! of a setting by Mr. Bocquet of Bande- 
loire's exquisite poem, "Le Balcon", the dreamy ecstasy of 
which is reflected to perfection in the music. Mr. Bonhote did 
full justice to the vocal part, while the composer played the 
pianoforte part which such extreme delicacy that, to many in 
the audience, his quite distinctive and very delectable har- 
monies were all but inaudible. Among other enjoyable fea- 
tures of the orchestral concerts must be mentioned the per- 
formances of two of Mozart's Pianoforte Concertos. That 
in A major was played by Mr. Lindsay, under Mr. Bainton's 
direction, with polished technique, and a full appreciation 
of the formal beauty of the work. Mr. Pauer, who played 
the arly Concerto in G major, under Mr. Adler's direction, 
had a less grateful task to perform, the work being 'of 
comparatively small musical value; but he did all that was 
possible with the solo part, playing with refreshing crispness 
and sincerity. Lack of space forbids more than a brief 
reference to the other concerts. Mr. Frederick Keel sang 
English, Irish and French Folk-Songs with a perfection of 
taste and technique which enchanted his hearers. Mr. Bonhote 
must be cordially thanked for bringing forward some of Hugo 
Wolf's wonderful songs, which he sang with great beauty 
of tone and genuine feeling. Some further examples of Mr. 
Bocquet's work gave striking evidence of the very distinguish- 
ed position this composer occupies amongst song-writers of 
the present day. Mr. Bainton's brilliant performance of Ravel's 
shimmering "Oudine" — a delicious example of modern piano- 
forte writing — was a notable achievement. One is grateful 
for thoughful and expressive renderings of Schubert's "Tod 
und das Madchen" String ( Quartett, and of the A major 
Pianoforte Quartet of Brahms, and hopes that more promi- 
nence will be given to chamber -music in future programmes. 
It would be interesting to hear some modern works in this 
form by English, French, and Russian composers. b. J. d. 

Since the above notice was written, two further concerts 
have been given. 

At the Choral Concert on Feb. 13 th. the most interesting 
feature was the performance of the fourth group of "Hymns 



28 



from the Rig Veda", by G. von Hoist. The work of. this 
composer — quite English, in spite of his name! — j,s 
marked by a rhythmic vitality and a refreshing disregard 
of the niceties of modern chromatic harmony which, if result- 
ing in a certain clumsiness and crudeness of effect, impart to 
his music a striking vitality and distinction. These qualities 
are markedly evident in the work under consideration, fc>f 
which a very good performance was given by Mr. Bainton's 
Choir. Bantock's "Lucifer in Starlight", with its overstrained 
attempts at originality, alternating with passages of watered- 
down Elgar, is not at all a satisfactory piece of. work: nor 
was its performance on this occasion particularly good, se- 
veral parts being very much out of tune. An enjoyable feature 
of this concert was the excellent performance, by Messrs. 
Bainton, Marshall and Schlesinger, of some Negro Melodies, 
charmingly arranged for pianoforte, violin, and violoncello by 
S. Coleridge-Taylor. The fifth orchestral concert, given under 
Mr. Macmillan's direction on Feb. 20 th. was a great success. 
The opening number was Mendelssohn's "Hebrides" Overture, 
of which a picturesque and finely-shaded performance was 
secured. Mr. Godfrey Ludlow achieved a genuine success Joy 
his very fine rendering of the solo part of Bruch's. Concerto 
in G minor. His playing was ,notable alike for the beauty 
of tone and brillance of technique, and one was glad .to. hear 
Mr. Ludlow in a work more worthy of his powers than 
some of the cheap trifles with which he has - tickled .the 
ears of the camp from, time to time. 

The orchestral accompaniment was played with admirable 
taste and sympathy. Arensky's Variations on a theme of 
Tschaikowsky — a very lifeless and unskilful composition 
— served to demonstrate the excellent qualities of the strings 
of the orchestra, in spite of some roughnesses here, and there. 
Mr. Frederick Keel added to the delights of a delightful 
concert by his singing of Vaughan Williams' "Songs of 
Travel", and of some charming English Folk-Songs, the lat- 
ter, as usual, proving very much to the taste of the audience. 

It is clear that in Mr. Macmillan we have a conductor 
of rare promise: such a combination of perfectly natural tech- 
nique with splendid musicianship will assuredly lead to bril- 
liant achievements in the future. B. J. D. 



Every picture taxs a Story 




^w-z^5^- 






■ 



29 



Prisoners Pulse .- 



Td/AG& ftMMflTte Ohi/QRT QF r/QT/QL C&5E QF 
ST& fiNGULflTE.D HOP E. 



PE.RIOD Of=- OME MOMTH 

e™ 3 IO 12 14 I© 13 ZO 22 24 26 28 30 2 




Ha/iudnations 
Megalomania 
Hysteria 

Singing, Whistl/ncf 
Uneasiness 
Dejection 

Profound Mclancho/y 
Coma. Convulsions 
Death & Destruction of 



GJtRDEWING. 



THERE are signs that the welcome spring will soon be 
here, and though, we cannot have the pleasure, — much 
longed for — of seeing and smelling our homely English 
flowers at home., I think that some hints to camp gardeners 
will not be out of place. It behoves the garden lover to Re- 
thinking of his Ruhleben bed, (I mean "garden bed", of 
course!) and at once to obtain and prepare the soil for what- 
ever variety of flowers or plants he intends to cultivate. 
Naturally, wherever possible a southerly aspect should be 
chosen; but where this is not possible then take the next, 
sunniest and most sheltered spot. I hope we shall see more 
of our almost national flower — the sweet pea — this 
summer. To cultivate this flower properly, the ground, should 
be prepared and trenched as thooroughly as possible, up to. three 
feet, and good manure placed at the bottom of the trench in 
the late autumn; but quite a nice show will be obtained ,if 
some good, already decayed manure is deeply dug into the 
ground without delay. Nasturtiuns (climbers and dwarfs.), 
Viola, or ordinary Pansies, Peutonias, Asters, Begonias, Ge- 
raniums, Marguerite, &c, and a few nice bush roses will 
make a real good show with a minimum of trouble, and they 
will bloom all the summer. Cuttings of these or small plants 






30 



can be easily obtained from a market gardener in Spandau. 
Lobelia and Feather fue will provide pretty borders, besides 
giving your bed a little variety in colour. 

If I (might suggest it, a show of Convolvulus along the 
front of the Barracks, trained up between the windows 1 , 
would amply repay time and trouble spent; they are quite 
simple to cultivate. Prepare at once a narrow strip of ground, 
quite close to the wall of the Barrack, for the reception of 
the seeds, setting same from one and a half to two inches 
apart, and about the same depth. Seeds should be set from 
the 1 st. to the middle of April, or even later, but not earlier. 
The climbing propensities of the convulvolus can be aided by 
means of string attached to nails driven into the wall. No 
doubt seeds have already been written for from home, 
but should this not be the case, there is time enough if you 
write at once. The Military Censor, Room 10, will pass a 
special letter ordering seeds, and thus save the usual ten 
days delay. 

We -have already seen the very pretty effect achieved by 
window boxes (Barrack I. last summer), and it only remains 
for others to emulate their example. Get your boxes ready 
now, so that when the young plants are ready for planting 
out there is no delay. Don't forget to bore a few holes in the 
bottom of the boxes and under the soil; put a thin layer of 
broken pot or small clinkers to provide a sufficient" drainage. 
The greatest enemy of some of oar gardens last summer was 
the dust which fell on the plants, when the loft steps were 
being swept down. This can be easily remedied by collecting 
a sufficient number of boxes from the recipients of parcels, 
and nailing them on the underside of the steps. Plants, 
especially young ones, must be protected from dust, or they 
will never flourish. Never water your garden when the sun 
is shining on it; the best time is in the evening, and then 
do it well, especially in the hot, dry weather. The best plan 
is to have a tub of water standing in the sun all day, thus 
taking away the chill, as ice-cold water direct from the 
main, takes too much heat out of the soil, thus having an 
adverse effect on the growth and strength of the roots of 
the plants. Do not fill your flower beds too full, but give 
each plant plenty of room for air and sun, without which 
they will not flourish. If you do not do this, you will only 
have disappointing results in return for your labours. 

Perhaps some may think that gardens are superfluous 
in the Camp, but whether we be in our own land, or in 
someone else's, a pretty, well cared for garden, however 
small, reflects credit on those who provide it. 



m m 



&&& 



immm 



I 



These few remarks wjill, I trust, be useful to those who 
have not had the opportunity of taking up gardening as a 
hobby — but are nevertheless willing to (try their hand in .making 
their present domicile as much like "Home sweet Home" 
as possible. FORGET-ME-NOT. 

Camp Garden Plots* 

Sir, 

No self-respecting Town Council in England is without 
its Parks and Gardens Committee; surely in Ruhleben, too, 
some public energy, and public funds, could be devoted to 
beautifyng the Camp ? With such a body in existence, some 
organised effort could be made with the happiest results, 
in the direction of utilising the spaces available for floral 
decoration. Some bright colour, for example, introduced round 
the arc lamps in the compound, and by the gateways, and in 
that dismal waste ^between the "village pump" and the dentist's 
surgery would be a source of untold joy to all, throughout the 
summer and autumn, and would be one of the few beautiful 
things to which we could look back in Ruhleben. The thing is 
worth doing, and worth doing well; each Barrack should set 
to work to contribute its share of colour to the compound. 
Though not every one, like Wordsworth, is moved beyond 
tears by the contemplation of a primrose, nearly all feel the 
fresh, graceful, and innocent appeal of flowers. "A Gar- 
den", says Bacon, "is the purest of human pleasures; it 
is the greatest refreshment to the Spirit of man." 

Yours truly, 
March, 1916. 

M. S. PEASE. 




v/.ovn 



:ir' 



mm 




Space permitting, 
m/iope to jive 
another instalment 
ofRaklebens 
%LLqsI Constable 
tatkenejciJVf 



FOUR EJiSY QUESTIONS. 

THERE are twelve men in one of the Barracks, who are 
in the habit of going together to the kitchens to draw 
rations; thus, when marching in fours, they make three rows. 
They were told to arrange themselves differently each time 
they formed up, and it was intimated that, when othey had 
exhausted every possible combination, they would be allowed 
to go home. They are now carrying out this "shuffling" 
process at every line-up for meals, that is to say, at the 
rate of two meals a day. When will they have qualified for 
permission to leave? 

* 
Two men in a fatigue party, which numbered 41, refused 
to do any hauling. To settle the matter, the foreman arranged 
the whole party in a circle; he then started at a particular 
point, and counted the men; every third man (that is to say, 
numbers 3, 6, 9, 12, and so on) had to leave the circle, and 
take his place by the rope. The two strikers stationed them- 
selves so as to escape the count by being the last two men. 

How did they manage this ? 

* * 

* 

In the early days of the Camp, before Pondside Stores 
had developed into their present Harrodian proportions, a 
can of milk, containing 24 pints, was received for sale one 
morning. Three customers arrived, each of whom ordered 8 
pints to be sent to him; but the only measures in the pro- 
prietor's possession were a tin which held 13 pints, another 
containing 11 pints, and a third which held 5 pints. This was 
a problem to the Pondside proprietors, but they were not down- 
hearted, and in less than half an hour they had measured 
out the milk into three portions of 8 pints each. How was 
this done? 



Last August Bank Holiday a punter from Barrack Z 
went to a roulette table on the sports ground, determined to 
make some money. His system was to bet a certain definite 
fraction (say one-tenth, but any fraction will do) of the 
total amount of money in his possession each time; he backed 
even chances only. This process he repeated all day long, 
until the ground was closed, at which time he had won as 
many timetS as he had lost. Was he richer or poorer when 
he got back to his Barrack? 



34 



HOCKEY. 



OWING to climatic and geological conditions, the Ruh- 
leben hockey player is forced to ind/ulge in energetic 
rather than accurate play; and that, perhaps, even to a 
greater degree than any of his brother sportsmen. The corn- 
pleat hockey player requires, as an essential part of his 
equipment, a ground like a billiard table : and a ground which 
consists, as a rule, of mountains, and of mud and pools of 
water can scarcely be said to satisfy this condition. Ruh- 
leben sportsmen, however, cannot afford to be squeamish, 
and the hockey enthusiast plunges into the thick of it, strength- 
ened by the comforting reflection that a had ground is a 
great leveller, and gives the beginner a fair chance in en- 
countering players more skilful than himself. 

In the Rarrack Competition, Rarracks 10 and 8 have 
tied for the first place. It has been decided to repeat the 
Competition, and since Rarrack 10 did not have a full side 
out against Rarrack 8 in their previous encounter, they are 
the favourites ; on paper they are certainly a stronger side. 
Unfortunately the strength of most sides was apt to vary, 
owing to the vagaries of those gifted mortals who play 
all games with equal ease, and consider that that elusive 
thing, "their duty to their Rarrack" compels them to endanger 
life and limb on the Soccer and Rugger fields. Whatever 
the result of the games, keenness has always been shown, 
and no games at Ruhleben have been played in a more plea- 
sant or sporting spirit. — C. 




\$HAT wfcfc.TJife. MISSIS SENP Mg*T ? 



3PM 



GOLF NOTES. 



35 



THE British taxpayer reads of a golf course provided, 
at his expense, and sees visions of an undulating 18-hole 
course with luxurious clubhouse in this healthy paradise. 

We at Ruhleben know better. But still we have had a great 
deal of real enjoyment out of the child that we brought into 
being, and fostered with such difficulty and care. We realised 
from the start that it was impossible to make anything out 
of the small barren space at our disposal, and so we just 
laid out five simple holes, — and started. Since then we 
have had championships, tournaments, driving competitions 
&c, on our little green. 

The professionals, as well as the amateurs, have been glad 
of a little practice, and many a novice has seized the opport- 
unity to make his debut as a golfer on a course where 
tuition is good, fees are small, and where there are no 
embarrassments for the beginner. 

With winter upon us, and the course in very bad con- 
dition, the interest of the enthusiasts chiefly centres round 
the practice nets, and the little approaching and putting course, 
where there is still a lot to learn, even for the idealist who 
sighs for Sandwich or Sunningdale. 

It was a bitter disappointment to us, not being able to 
secure the other half of the race-course for golf. W T e were 
quite prepared to bear any reasonable expense involved, and 
to guarantee that the ground would not suffer. Let us hope 
that the summer will bring us the permission. 

At any rate owing to our own initiative (and our own 
five-bobs) the venture has been a decided success, and one 
that will, at any rate, afford the British taxpayer ample proof 
of the old saying that "there is plenty of life in the old dog 
yet." MIDGET DIMPLE. 




THE FIRST TROTTINO MATCH ATRUHLE6FIH 






36 



ARTS AND SCIENCE UNION. 



THE Christmas number of the Camp Magazine made public, 
in delicately humorous vein, the proceedings at the last 
general meeting of the Union, which resulted in a change of 
President and the infusion of new blood into the Committee. 
The activity of the Union since that date has been correspond- 
ingly lively. To take the Monday evenings first, the plan 
of illustrated lectures on artistic matters has been developed. 
Three such lectures on the Drama were given, two by Mr. 
Pender, on Maeterlinck and Strindberg, and one by Mr. Kapp 
on the Drama as a work of Art. The Maeterlinck evening, the 
first of its kind, (one by Mr. Ford on Shaw, in the days of 
Captain Brassbound, having been effectually strangled 
at its birth), bore some traces of a struggle with the 
difficulties invariably besetting the path of those (whether 
inside or outside of this camp) who try to present 
serious dramatic work to the public. The Strindberg 
evening showed that these difficulties may be overcome, 
with what expenditure of energy only the producers can tell 
us, and was very well received, being repeated to a full house. 
On the following Monday, "The Stronger", and "Creditors" 
were given, the grim realism of the last being fully appreciated. 
Mr. Kapp gave us a promising little play of his own, "Below 
the Surface"; the Salvation Shelter scenes from "Major 
Barbara", the humour of which did not fail of . effect in 
Messrs. Merritt and P. Maurice's rendering, and some scenes 
from "Little Eyolf". A lecture on Greek Tragedy, with scenes 
from Euripides' "Electra" is announced. 

Literary lectures included "Galsworthy", by Mr. Tivey, 
whose good fortune in being released is our great loss, as his 
lecture alone would suffice to prove : Mr. Pender, with fresh 
and interesting views on "The New Poetry", with readings by 
Messrs. Bell, Kap|), and Mc. Dermot: and an account of the 
English Sonneteers, with introduction by Mr. Strachan; Shake- 
speare, Milton, and Wordsworth, being dealt with by Messrs. 
Ford, Coote, and Buyers respectively. This was the fourth 
evening devoted to poetry, and drew an interested and appre- 
ciative audience. Mr. Egremont gave us the advantage of his 
professional knowledge in a most interesting lecture on the 
Development of the Theatre, which might have p-roved of 
interest and x profit to our budding dramatists and producers, 
and even to those who claim to be in full bloom, had they 
attended it. 

Very successful was the third A. & S. U. musical 
evening, a lecture on Grieg by Mr. Hunt, followed by a concert 
of his works under Mr. Hunt's direction, which ranked in 
excellence of production with the best of our Camp concerts. 



37 

The scientific lectures have up to the present necessarily been 
scanty, but with the prospect of apparatus being obtainable 
in the future, more may be done later. Messrs. Croad, Higgins 
and Hill on "Food and Food-products" showed how acceptable 
the plain statement of scientific facts, when spiced with 
humour, may be made. 

The Circles, in spite of the fact that their future abiding 
place in the Cinema still waits for complete insulation from 
the sounds from the Hall, have most of them arranged very 
promising programmes, and begun with equal promise to work 
through them. Space does not permit of details. Some Circles, 
by the way, are already testing the usefulness of the dramatic 
method in beguiling the dulness of the paths of learning, 
though the suggestion of a chemical ballet, illustrating the 
dance of atoms and molecules, has not yet, we believe, been 
carried into effect by the Science Circle. 

Suitable Circle papers, together with others from 
indepedent lecturers, will be worked into a series of popular 
lectures, in continuation of those arranged out of doors by 
the Union last summer. 

We should like to draw attention to the fact that the 
funds raised by the performances of the Union are devoted to 
educational work, and serve to support the Camp School in 
its admirable work of free education. 



NOTHING SO COMMON 




F&8CELS OFFICIAL (reading libel onFreemasDnJ pn| 'WJanes is a. MiCcn.iT- --».? ' 
MKSE«0ER;"OI»Dearme No, Sir! He's ^.Dentist/' 



38 




CAMP NOTES. 

THE following events of interest to the interned have occurred 
during the last twelve months: — 

Barracks 14 and 15 erected, February 1915; two Boiler houses 
erected hy Relief Fund, February; portion of Race course opened 
and first game played, March 28; new Bairack? opened for 
lads of 18 years of age and under, June 15; hot water boiler 
house enlarged, June 24; hot water tickets issued, July 7; opening 
of Young Mens' Christian Association Building, December 24. 



THE following casualties have taken place during the period 
4 th. October last, and 5th. January this year: left shoulder 
injured, (2); left elbow dislocated (1); left eye injured, (1); 
ear injured, (1); right arm and right leg, (1 each); injuria* 
to knees, (1); ribs, (1); spine, (1); left side, (4); right ankle, 
(1); left leg, (1). It is noticeable that in nearly every case, the 
left side ot the body has suffered. Hockey was responsible for 
one ot the casualties; the rest must be debited to football. 



THE totaf number of parcels dealt with during January 
was 39,994. Bread parcels, each containing two loaves received 
from the Hilfsstelle f. K. G. in Berne during the same period 
numbered 6,471; besides this, a considerable quantity comes from 
other sources in Holland, Belgium and Switzerland. A new depar- 
ture in Camp eccentricities has recently been instituted by the 
installation of a telephone between the English and German 
departments. We hear on the best authority that further limb 
and labour saving contrivances are contemplated. A moving 
stairway may be the result of the next brainwave of those budding 
engineers or whom the Post Office boasts so many. 



89 

HOW many committees are there in this Camp, and what 
functions do they perform ? We ask with the praiseworthy object 
ot obtaining information, £>ut we dioubt if anyone can give a 
satisfactory reply. We only know that their number is legion, 
and that one comes across committees at very step. We are 
developing ;a surprising faculty for looking after one another, 
though whether this will make for our ultimate benefit is open 
to question. Certain it is that the number of things a man 
can do without consulting a committee can hardly be wcrth 
doing. More than this, these committees appear, in many cases, 
to consist ot contending parties, whlo take it in turns to make 
and mar schemes. Probably, in the end, they do not accomplish 
much in either direction. It seems a pity that a good deal of 
this work can not be co-ordinated and regularised; this would 
make [for more equitable treatment, at any rate, and lessen delays. 
As things are at present you stand a better chance of getting 
what you want out of the Committee if you have the ear of 
(say) Jones than would be the case if your supporter is (say) 
Robinson. The late Bishop Wilberforce used to say that the 
only Society he would join wiould be a "Society for the total 
suppression of all other Societies", and there is something to 
be said for his Lordship's point of view. The fact is we get 
through a terrible deal of talking before doing anything, and 
the habit seems to be on the increase. 




THE sketch gives a useful sugges- 
tion for a tabe decoration; the design 
can be varied to suit the taste of 
workers in wood. It should be made 
of some hard wood, and stands about 
two feet high; upper cage work iis 
made i/ 2 -inch square section; the box 
forming base contains soil, should be 
tin-lined, and is of one-inch wood. The 
two sides of the cage work at the back 
are omitted from drawing. The larger 
opening, left at A, is for repotting, 
watering, etc.; and the design, as well 
is measurements, can be varied to any 
extent. 






40 




"Hello Wi£eyT 



g)Hdvino, forgotten Lotfi how to dress & behave 
e empty our cop before asking fbi* a 

second one. 




(|) "Old Habits $ticki 



'4.) lOT^ettind our altered eircumstences Oour native 
^ Tongue |V\fe ask - Hal>en. y»u Keute axy 
Margarine vfelletcht?" 



41 



J2>etters to tfie Gdiior 




ALL letters to the editor must be accompanied by name and Barracfce 
Number of sender, not necessarily for publication but as a guarantee 

of good faith. 



THEATRE PRICES. 

Dear Sir, 

In its first three or four issues your paper advocated 
lowering of prices; at the Camp theatre, but later on we were 
given to understand that the Cinema and the alterations to 
the stage were swallowing up all profits, and that the 
expenses were such as to render the higher prices absolutely 
necessary. Now the Cinema has been paid for, or nearly so r 
and each show is again turning in a handsome profit, may 
I ask you to take up the cudgels onco again in favour iof 
at least two cheaper nights ? It is impossible to get a seat 
from which it is (possible both to see and hear for less than 
50 pfennigs, and that is too much. Why not pat up the prices 
of the nobs' seats 10 pfennigs, and lower the circle? Hoping 
you will be able to do something. 

Yours sincerely, 

THEATRE-GOER. 
{not a * nob" !) 



OLD POSTERS. 



Dear Mr. Editor, 

I don't want you to think that I am" unduly "fussy", 
but I really think that the old fragments of posters, notices, 
and miscellaneous announcements that disfigure the Camp 
buildings might be taken down. It is quite time ! These scraps 
of paper have long ceased to be useful or ornamental, and are 
really an eyesore, making the Lager more untidy-looking than 
it need be. 

Yours truly, 

March, 1916. 

CIRCUMSPICE. 



42 

FURTHER FOOTBALL NOTES. 

During the last few weeks several players have come 
to Ruhleben from other camps, and are welcome additions to 
the Barracks to which they have been assigned. 

The hand of sympathy from everyone in Ruhleben will 
go out to Vivian Woodward, the fine gentleman and brilliant 
footballer who has been wounded. 

With the advent of the fine weather a great number of 
non-footballers use the inner track for walking. May we 
request that all players refrain from playing football on that 
part of the course, as it interferes with the pleasure of the 
walkers ? 



LEAGUES UP TO DATE. 

FIRST LEAGUE. Goals 

Barrack P. W. L. D. F. A. Pts. 



9 


12 


12 








45 


5 


24 


10 


]2 


9 


3 





33 


18 


18 


11 


11 


7 


4 





42 


30 


14 


5 


12 


7 


5 





34 


27 


14 


8 


12 


6 


5 


1 


27 


24 


13 


4 


12 


5 


6 


1 


31 


28 


11 


20 


13 


4 


8 


1 


28 


32 


9 


3 


IB 


3 


7 


3 


23 


40 


9 


2 


12 


4 


7 


1 


22 


43 


9 


17 


12 


3 


9 





20 


35 


6 


7 


11 


2 


8 


1 


18 


41 


5 



SECOND LEAGUE. 



3 


13 


12 


1 





44 


11 


24 


Boys 


13 


9 


3 


1 


38 


16 


19 


9 


14 


7 


2 


5 


32 


17 


19 


4 


14 


6 


3 


5 


23 


17 


17 


5 


33 


7 


4 


2 


25 


15 


16 


8 


13 


6 


3 


4 


27 


24 


16 


10 


14 


6 


6 


2 


25 


28 


14 


7 


14 


4 


7 


3 


21 


30 


11 


17 


14 


5 


8 


1 


20 


40 


11 


20 


14 


4 


9 


1 


18 


26 


9 


11 


14 


4 


9 


1 


12 


23 


9 


2 


14 


3 


10 


1 


18 


30 


7 


15 


14 


2 


10 


2 


9 


35 


6 



43 



A PUZZLE FROM THE PARCELS 
POST OFFICE CAT. 

Ihave gathered from the remarks of some of the P. P. 0. 
fellows, that the other day, when the Colonel and the Babe 
went out with the working gang to unload a truck of English 
Parcels, they noticed the following: — The first parcel which 
came out of the truck was a Dutch one, which had got in by 
mistake. This they gave to one of the men to hand over 
to Hitchy Koo in the German Department. Then exactly 
one-fifth of the remaining parcels were unloaded into the 
cart. When the second cart came, the first parcel was again 
Dutch, and was put aside as before, after which exactly 
one-fifth of the remaining parcels were loaded into the cart. 
This happened in just the same way with each of the 
first five cart loads. The truck could not then have been 
empty because Moleskin George swears that more than five 
cart-loads came out of that truck, and Lord Horace asserts 
that the truck contained the minimum number of parcels 
which would allow of each of the first five carts taking 
exactly one-fifth of the remaining parcels, after one Dutch 
one had been taken out . . . What I want to know is, what 
was the original number of parcels in the truck? 




MEDIAEVAL 



RUHLEBEN 



ARCHITECTURE 



,v*W 



44 






45 



TWO TRIOLETS. 



1. 



Strolling round Ruhleben Camp 
Is better far than Stadtvogtei ; 
You quickly lose that prison tramp, 
Strolling. Around Ruhleben Camp 
Must be the limits of your tramp; 
For sentries go with watchful eye, 
Strolling around . . . Ruhleben Camp 
Is better than the Stadtvogtei! 




II. 

T'm tired with all this lining up, 
* At eight o'clock, or thereabouts; 
I'm sleeping soundly as a pup, - 
I'm tired. With all this lining up, 
My coffee freezes in the cup, — 
I hear the Barrack Captain's shouts, 
I'm tired with all this lining up 
At eight o'clock, or thereabouts! 

NITCHEVO. 




IMPOR TANT 

NOTICE TO 
OUR "READERS. 



IT IS HOPED THAT ARRAN- 
GEMENTS MAY BE MADE 
BY WHICH READERS MAY 
SEND THIS MAGAZINE TO 
ENGLAND SHOULD PER- 
MISSION TO THIS EFFECT 
BE GIVEN, FULL PARTI- 
CULARS WILL BE ANNOUN- 
CED AT AN EARLY DATE. 

ANY REGULATIONS WHICH MAY BE MADE 
BY THE MILITARY AUTHORITIES 
MUST BE STRICTLY OBEYED. 



■ »i 



• O«0»0»0«O»O»0«0 • 0»0«0»0#0»0»C»0« O • 0»0»O«09O«C»O»O« o • o»o»o*o»o*o«o»o» • o«o*o«o«o»o«o»o« 
o o 

• • 
o o 

• • 
o o 

• • 
o o 

I LA VIE FRANCMSE | 

I DE RUHLEBEN I 




REDACTEUR EN CHEF:- 
H. ALF. BELL. 



Ruhleben printing Dorks 

All Camp printing and duplicating done at 
No. 2 Fleet Street. 

For terms apply to 

The Camp Printer, L. Spicer, 



iRK OF f] 



k e ^j^e £L^ e 



IS INCREASING 






(in ruhleben) ' 



All that was lefts 

of thern, 
left of 6 Bottles! 




SMOKING HABIT CURED! 

for 72 HOURS 

PARTICULARS & TESTIMONIALS FROM 

CARETAKER, BARRACK XL 

J. S. PREUSS, Printer by Appointment to the Royal Court, Berlin S., Dresdenerstr.43.-3 



.■'■,■'-•■'.■■-... 






4 




-■-■■' ■•■■ 



W^M ^:rX-;:- Y%>¥< 



■ 



''"'■ i '''.■• ^ .'■-•■";''"■■■■■• ' 

llEIili ■■■.■.■■.•.:■.■..:■.•■..■■ 

■ .■■■.'■, ■ . . •• . -••■ 



V 



^fe- 



.''■■■■.'■■■.■■ ■..*v • 

■-'■'■■■.■■."■''■■ 



BSHHIHBHHfflS 

' >\ ■■=■■• : ''■'■ • 



■ ■"'-■■■■'' 

■■salt 







HHSHHH 

nnHHM (By* ** 
' E 1hHS$ 

beep '